National briefs (1/12/12)

Orange juice imports halted WASHINGTON — The federal government temporarily halted shipments of imported orange juice from all countries Wednesday and said it will destroy or ban products containing even low levels from a banned fungicide. The imports will be held while they’re tested and may be sold if levels are below trace amounts, according to the Food and Drug Administration. The fungicide, linked in studies to higher risk of liver tumors in animals, was found in trace amounts last month in products from Brazil, which produces almost one in every six glasses of orange juice consumed in the U.S., according to CitrusBR, an export industry association. While the chemical, carbendazim, is used in crops in many countries, it isn’t approved for use in oranges in the United States. Breakaway Episcopal case WASHINGTON — A Virginia judge has ruled against seven conservative congregations that broke away from the Episcopal Church in 2006, rejecting their argument that they should be able to keep valuable church property that the national denomination also claims. The case has drawn worldwide attention because it involves a cluster of large, prominent churches with well-known conservative pastors and because the issues at hand — particularly the Episcopal Church’s continued acceptance of same-sex relationships as equal to heterosexual ones — are roiling much of organized religion. The congregations are part of a movement called the Anglican Church in North America, and all believe that they, not the Episcopal Church, represent true Anglicanism on the continent. Legionnaires’ source MILWAUKEE — An outbreak of Legionnaires’ disease in Wisconsin has been linked to a decorative water wall in a hospital lobby, according to a study published Tuesday that suggested the popular architectural feature can pose dangers in a health-care setting, especially for people with weakened immune systems. In 2010, eight people contracted the severe and potentially life-threatening form of pneumonia caused by the bacteria. None had been admitted to the Milwaukee-area hospital at the time of exposure. But they all had walked by the water wall in the main hospital lobby, researchers said online in Infection Control and Hospital Epidemiology. The disease is spread through inhalation contact with contaminated water sources. Casey Anthony pregnancy ORLANDO, Fla. — Casey Anthony told a psychiatrist that she became pregnant with her daughter, Caylee, after passing out at a party when she was 18 years old, according to depositions in which the doctor said tests gave no indication that Ms. Anthony was mentally ill as she faced her murder trial. Ms. Anthony was acquitted last July of killing her 2-year-old daughter, Caylee. Ms. Anthony didn’t know who fathered Caylee, the psychiatrist, Jeff Danziger, recounted in a deposition that was unsealed by a Florida judge and released Wednesday. — Compiled from news services First published on January 12, 2012 at 12:00 am

An Account Of The Blake Griffin-Kendrick Perkins Dunk

I had the great fortune of being at the Los Angeles Clippers – Oklahoma City Thunder game last night.  My friend has season tickets and he was nice enough to offer me a seat, which he does on occasion.  Now, in the past, Clippers games were like Michael Bay movies; two hours of people running around doing things that made absolutely no sense and caused you to question the intelligence of everyone involved."Let's spend the movie trying to out run these machines that have wheels. That feels like a good plan."And to some degree that happens this year.  The Clippers are still learning to play together and their coach Vinny Del Negro sometimes looks like he wandered in to the building and is trying to find someone who might tell him where the bathroom is."Hi, um, I just was wondering if you guys had a bathroom? I'll buy something, I just really need to go."But they are young-ish, and athletic, and they have one thing that no else in the NBA has: Blake Griffin.  And last night, Blake dunked on Kendrick Perkins so god damned hard that he wasn’t just dunking on Kendrick Perkins.  He was dunking on everyone who had ever been named Kendrick.Anna Kendrick? YOU JUST GOT FUCKING DUNKED ON AND KENDRICK ISN'T EVEN YOUR FIRST NAME.Basically the play was a pick and roll where Chris Paul drew in the defenders, Blake rolled, and Chris hit him with a perfect bounce pass that split the defense.    It’s the most common play in basketball, and its a play that has delivered quite a few Blake dunks.  Normally everyone clears out and lets Blake angrily slam it home and play resumes.  But last night Kendrick Perkins nobly attempted to stop it.  And kudos to him.  He should have.  It’s his job.  Last year I watched Chris Kaman, the old center for the Clippers, time and again rotate late with his help defense, for the sole reason that he did not want to be the token white guy who got dunked on.  Guess what?  It usually happened anyway."Hi, Dwight. Would you mind laying it up so that I may save myself further humiliation?"So Kendrick went up to stop it, and fronted Blake a good three feet away from the basket, taking away the lane with which Blake would fly towards the rim and hammer home a dunk.  But instead of attempting to lay it up, blake rose in the air above Kendrick, so that Kendrick’s face was in Blake’s stomach (Kendrick is 6’10″ for reference), and then extended his arm out and hurled the ball at the rim like Zeus firing a lightning bolt at the earth which had angered him.Here it is for you to see:The crowd went crazy.  And I don’t mean that in the same way that Joe Buck says it during a broadcast of a Washington Redskins game no one gives a shit about.  The crowd literally lost their mind.  People were hurling things in to the air with reckless abandon.  No one even watched the next two minutes of the game.  There was an eight year old kid next to me and his dad turned to him and very seriously said “You are going to be able to tell your grandchildren that you were here to see that dunk.  I need you to remember this,” like he was giving him fucking directions on where to find him during the apocalypse."Don't ever forget this. And if someone tries to eat you, run."After a few minutes, and roughly 4000 replays on the jumbo-tron, people calmed enough to watch the rest of the game.  Was it the greatest dunk ever?  Who the fuck knows.  That’s an incredibly stupid question that will be used to fill two hours of sports talk radio today.  But it was a fantastic dunk, and I felt lucky to be there.

Full Force's Paul Anthony on Why He Revealed Cancer on TV One's 'Unsung'

January 31st, 2012 by Welcome to my Blog superstoreblogs,.com Another great episode of UnSung will be on tonight featuring the Legendary group Full Force! Check out what they have to say about the episode.by Roman Wolfe.More than 100 cyclists from as far away as California descended on the ninth annual Tour of the Bahamas – the nation's premier cycling event – this weekend in Nassau. Local and foreign competitors competed for up to $16000 in cash prizes and awards. So many worthy stories have already been told via “Unsung,” TV One's compelling series about musical performers who haven't gotten their just due. Unsung: Full Force aired on TV One yesterday at 10 p.m. Did you catch it?by Roman Wolfe January 30th, 2012 @ 2:10pm (AllHipHop News) Veteran Hip-Hop band Full Force will be the subject of a special episode of “Unsung” tonight Jan.More than 100 cyclists from as far away as California descended on the ninth annual Tour of the Bahamas – the nation's premier cycling event – this weekend in Nassau. Local and foreign competitors competed for up to $16000 in cash prizes and awards. One of the Country’s Top Debt Help Companies Based on their credentials and Successful rates of clients that this company has been able to help with their credit repair problems.Plus I.R.S. help Free online debt analysis .onedebthelp.com/

Promise of full media play at Tamar offices – The Standard

Promise of full media play at Tamar offices Thursday, January 12, 2012 Chief Secretary Stephen Lam Sui- lung has vowed to help journalists at the new Central Government Complex in Tamar after reporters were held off by security guards and claims of manhandling. “The government is totally committed to safeguarding press freedom under the Basic Law as it is one of the core values that contribute to Hong Kong’s success as an international city,” Lam said. He put the earlier incidents down to miscommunication between the Administration Wing and security staff. “The Administration Wing has already expressed its apologies in this regard. We guarantee these standing arrangements will continue,” said Lam, adding that security staff have been briefed on how to accommodate the media. ADVERTISEMENT On Monday, a photographer was reportedly pushed out of the way by a security guard when he wanted to snap education chief Michael Suen Ming-yeung as he returned to work after a bout of Legionnaires’ disease. Though the bacteria involved was found in the washrooms of several officials, the government says the complex is now safe. DIANA LEE

So, What Is Ferris Bueller Up to Now? – HispanicBusiness.com

A bathrobe-clad Matthew Broderick shuffles to the window, flings open the curtains and deadpans simply, “How can I handle work on a day like today?” It’s impossible to tell what’s grayer about the “Ferris Bueller”-esque clip that hit the Web on Thursday and quickly went viral — the ambiguity of what it’s promoting, or the hair atop the once eternally youthful Broderick’s head. The 10-second snippet trails off with the film’s deeply baritone “Oh Yeah” music (“bow bow … chick … chicka chicka”) playing over a stark “2.5.12″ on the screen, leaving the viewer wondering what the now-all-grown-up-and-then-some Ferris will be doing that day. Best-kept secret ever of a forthcoming “Bueller” sequel, 26 years in the making? Doubtful. A tease to a forthcoming Super Bowl ad? More likely. The clip was posted to YouTube by user “chuckachucka2012,” with the note: “We hate to be such a tease, but on a day like today, we just have to. Stick it out until the Super Bowl, or take a ‘day off’ on Monday and catch the big reveal.” Auto site Jalopnik.com reported Friday that it’s a Super Bowl spot for Honda, with a vehicle from that automaker taking the place of the familiar Ferrari featured in the late John Hughes’ 1986 classic. The game between the New England Patriots and New York Giants will be played Feb. 5 in Indianapolis. “The big jump the two valets do in Cameron’s dad’s Ferrari? We hear this time it’s going to be a Honda CR-V,” Jalopnik reported, citing an unidentified source familiar with Honda who told Jalopnik the company planned an elaborate ad spoofing much of the Chicago-based homage to high school hooky. A Honda spokesman confirmed the company is doing a Super Bowl ad, but would not comment on the ad’s content. Just what the reprised Ferris will do in the ad — and how well the now nearly 50-year-old Broderick can recapture the slickness of the role — remains to be seen. If the teaser is any indication, the modern-day Ferris seems to more readily recall Ben Stein’s monotone economics teacher (“Bueller … Bueller …”) than he does the peak-of-his-youth title character who flings open his bedroom curtains to reveal a nice spring day and asks early in the film, “How can I possibly be expected to handle school on a day like this?” But after watching the clip of Broderick’s aged Bueller, another line from the movie comes to mind … “Life moves pretty fast. If you don’t stop and look around once in a while, you could miss it.”

The Associated Press: Will Facebook deliver an IPO surprise?

Will Facebook deliver an IPO surprise?By PALLAVI GOGOI, AP Business Writer–9 minutes ago NEW YORK (AP) — Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg turns up at business conventions in a hoodie. “Cocky” is the word used to describe him most often, after “billionaire.” He was Time’s person of the year at 26.So when he takes Facebook public, why would he follow the Wall Street rules?The company is expected to file as early as Wednesday to sell stock on the open market in what will be the most talked-about initial public offering since Google in 2004, maybe since the go-go 1990s.Around the nation, regular investors and IPO watchers are anticipating some kind of twist — perhaps a provision for the 800 million users of Facebook, a company that promotes itself as all about personal connections, to get in on the action.”Pandemonium is what I expect in terms of demand for this stock,” says Scott Sweet, senior managing partner at IPO Boutique, an advisory firm. “I don’t think Wall Street would want to anger Facebook users.”The most successful young technology companies have a history of doing things differently. Google’s IPO prospectus contained a letter from its founders to investors that said the company believed in the motto “Don’t be evil.”Facebook declined to comment, but Reena Aggarwal, a finance professor who has studied IPOs at Georgetown University’s McDonough School of Business, believes Zuckerberg will emulate Google’s philosophy, at least in principle.Founders Larry Page and Sergey Brin wanted an IPO accessible to all investors, and said so in their first regulatory filing. Facebook may say something similar when it files to declare its intention to sell stock publicly.Facebook is expected to raise as much as $10 billion, which will value the company at $75 billion to $100 billion, making it one of the largest IPOs. A stock usually starts trading three to four months after the filing.The highly anticipated filing will reveal how much Facebook intends to raise from the stock market, what it plans to do with the money and details on its own financial performance and future growth prospects.Along with Wall Street investment banks, Google used a Dutch auction, named for a means of selling flowers in Holland, to sell its shares. It took private bids and allowed investors to say how many shares they wanted and what they were willing to pay.The process wasn’t smooth, though, and Google had to slash its expected offer price at the last minute. If you bought at the IPO, for roughly $85 a share, you still did well: Google closed Tuesday at $580.More recently, when it filed for an IPO last June, Groupon, which emails daily deals on products and services to its members, added a letter from its 30-year-old founder, Andrew Mason.”We are unusual and we like it that way,” the letter said. “We want the time people spend with Groupon to be memorable. Life is too short to be a boring company.”It’s almost become conventional for tech companies to include an unconventional letter when they make their stock market debut. It’s widely expected that Zuckerberg, in the very least measure of showmanship, will write one.But IPO watchers wonder whether there might be a provision specifically designed to give the little-guy investor, even the casual Facebook user who doesn’t invest, a piece of the debut.”There is a feeling that there will be something unique in store for Facebook users,” Aggarwal says.When most companies go public, they let Wall Street investment banks handle everything, with the sweet ground-floor stock price reserved for big institutional investors.But that probably won’t do for Facebook, created in a Harvard University dorm room eight years ago. Or Zuckerberg, whose antiestablishment credentials include spurning a $15 billion takeover offer from Microsoft.Few expect Zuckerberg to offer a Dutch auction because of the Google experience. But he is at least as unorthodox as Google’s founders. People expect him to be in the driver’s seat on Wall Street, rather than hand over the controls to bankers.Facebook is a vital part of people’s Internet lives and the most successful company in the history of social media. Its closest competitor, Google+, has less than a tenth the active membership — 60 million people.”While there is no such thing as untouchable, Facebook is getting near there, with even Google imitating it,” says Sweet, of IPO Boutique.In “really hot IPOs,” 90 percent of the shares go to institutional investors and 10 percent to everyday investors, Sweet says. It’s a perk for the banks’ biggest clients, like Fidelity Investments or T. Rowe Price or hedge funds.The funds pay big commissions to the banks for regularly trading large blocks of stocks or bonds. Those relationships are deep and long-lasting — and lucrative for the banks. The funds expect to be rewarded.But Morgan Stanley and Goldman Sachs, the banks expected to guide the Facebook IPO, are in an awkward place: They don’t want to tick off 800 million Facebook users — but they don’t want to tick off Fidelity, either.Most IPOs are underpriced, and the stock usually shoots up the first day. Lucky large investors get the basement price and usually a big payday if they sell on the first day. Smaller investors buy on the open market, after the price has spiked, and pay more.And most early investors do sell. One university research paper found that about 70 percent of the new stock changes hands in the first two days. Groupon introduced 35 million shares, but on the first day its shares were traded almost 50 million times.Ann Sherman, associate professor and IPO expert at DePaul University, raised the possibility that Facebook could set aside a portion of its shares for the small investor and use a lottery system if there is a lot of demand.She says the U.S. is the only country without IPO rules that put traditional investors on an equal footing.”Given that this is such a huge and popular IPO, I’ve been hoping that Facebook would use this opportunity to try a new method to bring in retail investors — a public offer where shares are set aside for only individual investors,” Sherman says.But Zuckerberg will also probably be careful how he plays his cards. He doesn’t want to anger Facebook users, but his primary goal is to raise money.The recent experience of Groupon’s faltering IPO holds tough lessons for young entrepreneurs. After analysts started questioning its accounting, Groupon had to amend its regulatory filing several times.Trying to salvage the IPO, founder Mason shed his trademark jeans and T-shirt and donned a suit. He dropped the irreverent talk and spoke about the company’s growth prospects at the IPO “roadshow” to impress investors.Other companies have encountered problems when they went public and tried to reward customers. Upstart Internet phone company Vonage wanted to give customers a chance to buy up to 15 percent of its 31 million shares at its IPO at $17 apiece.But when the shares fell 13 percent on the first day of trading, many of its small investors that had put in orders to buy didn’t want to pay the offer price. It gained the dubious title of one of the worst IPOs that year, something Facebook wants to avoid.It’s also more expensive to sell shares to many people. When thousands of small investors want to buy in, it becomes a logistical nightmare to make sure each investor gets a prospectus with all the important information.Banks like large investors because it costs about the same to process an order of 50 shares as 50,000. But William Hambrecht, founder and CEO of WR Hambrecht & Co., a firm that runs IPO auctions, says companies that value their customers benefit in the long run.He gives the example of Boston Beer, maker of Samuel Adams, which went public in 1995. Its founder, James Koch, wanted to reward the people who made his company successful: the buyers of Sam Adams.Koch set aside a quarter of his shares for the small investor. The deal was a big success and attracted more interest from his beer drinkers than there were shares available. Some people left out were dissatisfied.Hambrecht says about two-thirds of the investors who bought those shares still owned the stock two years after the IPO. Even today, about a third still own it. Hambrecht says that’s because these investors appreciate the company’s product.”Our argument has always been that true buyers of your stock ought to be your own customer base,” says Hambrecht. “As the great investor Peter Lynch said: Invest in what you know.” Copyright © 2012 The Associated Press. All rights reserved.

Too Cool to Be Forgotten Movie Lands Writers Russo and Sosenko « Spinoff Online – TV, Film and Entertainment News Daily

Movie 43 screenwriters Rocky Russo and Jeremy Sosenko are set to adapt Alex Robinson’s 2008 graphic novel Too Cool to Be Forgotten for Red Crown Productions and Likely Story, Deadline reports.The film is the first to emerge from Likely Story’s first-look deal with Top Shelf Productions, part of a 2010 capital investment in the independent publisher.The Harvey Award-winning graphic novel centers on Andy Wicks, a 40-something father of two who, after trying everything else, turns to hypnosis in an attempt to kick his 25-year smoking habit. Unfortunately for Andy, the hypnotherapy session seemingly transports back to 1985 and into his gangly teenage body, forcing him relive those awkward, horrifying years.Movie 43, written by Russo, Sosenko and Patrik Forsberg, is a sketch-comedy film featuring segments directed by Peter Farrelly, James Gunn and Brett Ratner, among others, and boasting an ensemble cast that includes Kristen Bell, Emma Stone, Gerard Butler, Halle Berry, Hugh Jackman, John Hodgman, Kate Winslett and Uma Thurman.

Althaus: It’s not Kauffman, but White finds baseball home

I had lunch with Frank White last week and the eight-time Gold Glove winner and five-time all-star asked me a question that caught me a bit off-guard. “I’ve been offered a coaching job with the T-Bones, what do you think?” asked White, between greeting fans and making everyone feel special at Tim’s Pizza.      It’s been well documented that the Kansas City Royals Hall of Famer was no longer associated with the Major League Baseball team, as the Royals removed the man who has a statue in center field of Kauffman Stadium from their broadcast team. White has opened a business, 8G’s – a reference to his eight gold gloves – and is now busy giving group and private baseball lessons in Lee’s Summit, his longtime home base. But Frank White is a baseball man. While George Brett is perhaps the greatest player of his generation, White was the personality of the Royals for 18 years. It never surprised me to see him sitting on the hood of his car after a game, chatting with a group of fans in the stadium parking lot. And if you don’t have a Frank White autograph, you don’t want it because he has never turned down a fan’s request. When Tim’s Pizza owner Tim Pace learned that White was coming for lunch, he offered a private room. White would have nothing to do with that. He enjoys visiting with baseball fans nearly as much as he did robbing Reggie Jackson of a base hit to right field. “I’m excited about the T-Bones organization,” White said. “I love working with the kids. Teaching is a passion. That’s why I’m working with kids in Lee’s Summit. I want to help little leaguers and pros be the best they can be.” The move is a win-win situation for the T-Bones and White. White is back in uniform and the American Association team has a Hall of Famer on its staff. White was named the American League Championship Series MVP in 1980 and hit cleanup in the 1985 World Series, when the Royals won their lone championship. He was just the second second baseman to hit cleanup in a Fall Classic. The first was Jackie Robinson. “That puts me in some pretty good company,” White said. White will join manager Tim Doherty’s staff and will serve in a variety of roles from the bench, and as first base coach. He will also work alongside T-Bones vice president and general manager Chris Browne, who first met White during his years as the Royals bat boy and clubhouse attendant. I had lunch with Frank White last week and the eight-time Gold Glove winner and five-time all-star asked me a question that caught me a bit off-guard. “I’ve been offered a coaching job with the T-Bones, what do you think?” asked White, between greeting fans and making everyone feel special at Tim’s Pizza.      It’s been well documented that the Kansas City Royals Hall of Famer was no longer associated with the Major League Baseball team, as the Royals removed the man who has a statue in center field of Kauffman Stadium from their broadcast team. White has opened a business, 8G’s – a reference to his eight gold gloves – and is now busy giving group and private baseball lessons in Lee’s Summit, his longtime home base. But Frank White is a baseball man. While George Brett is perhaps the greatest player of his generation, White was the personality of the Royals for 18 years. It never surprised me to see him sitting on the hood of his car after a game, chatting with a group of fans in the stadium parking lot. And if you don’t have a Frank White autograph, you don’t want it because he has never turned down a fan’s request. When Tim’s Pizza owner Tim Pace learned that White was coming for lunch, he offered a private room. White would have nothing to do with that. He enjoys visiting with baseball fans nearly as much as he did robbing Reggie Jackson of a base hit to right field. “I’m excited about the T-Bones organization,” White said. “I love working with the kids. Teaching is a passion. That’s why I’m working with kids in Lee’s Summit. I want to help little leaguers and pros be the best they can be.” The move is a win-win situation for the T-Bones and White. White is back in uniform and the American Association team has a Hall of Famer on its staff. White was named the American League Championship Series MVP in 1980 and hit cleanup in the 1985 World Series, when the Royals won their lone championship. He was just the second second baseman to hit cleanup in a Fall Classic. The first was Jackie Robinson. “That puts me in some pretty good company,” White said. White will join manager Tim Doherty’s staff and will serve in a variety of roles from the bench, and as first base coach. He will also work alongside T-Bones vice president and general manager Chris Browne, who first met White during his years as the Royals bat boy and clubhouse attendant. “I am thrilled to announce that Frank will be joining the T-Bones,” Browne said. “He will be an asset to Tim, our coaching staff and a great addition to the clubhouse overall. I look forward to seeing No. 20 in uniform at CommunityAmerica Ballpark, and I know our fans will too.”     White began his coaching career in 1992 when he was named manager of the Boston Red Sox’s Gulf Coast League affiliate. He later became first base coach for the Royals from 1997-2001, and eventually moved on to his most recent coaching stint with the Royals former Double-A affiliate, the Wichita Wranglers, where he served as manager from 2004-06. “I want to thank Chris for thinking of me and making this possible,” White said at the press conference where the T-Bones introduced their new coach. “We have a long history together, and I think this is a great way for me to give back to the game of baseball. I would also like to thank the T-Bones’ owners, John and Adam Ehlert, and I look forward to working with Tim to help him reach the team’s goals.” There wasn’t a moment when White wasn’t beaming during our lunch. And who could blame him? He was going home. His new home might be a few miles west of Kauffman Stadium, but anytime the greatest second baseman of his era is on a baseball diamond, it’s home.  

Kristen Bell’s Fashion Idol? Her Mom

Universal PicturesFor actress Kristen Bell, playing a 1980s TV reporter in the upcoming film Big Miracle was a chance to emulate her fashion idol: her mother.“I grew up in the ’80s but it wasn’t my prime. But I had older sisters and I definitely looked up to the way my mom dressed,” Bell told reporters during a press event Friday at the Casa Del Mar in Santa Monica. “The first time I realized, ‘Oh, look at these beautiful, stylish women in my life,’ was around the time the [Big Miracle] story happened.”Director Ken Kwapis calls Big Miracle — based on the real-life attempts to save a family of whales trapped by rapidly forming ice in 1988 Alaska — a “period piece, as weird as that sounds.” And while the film co-stars Drew Barrymore and John Krasinski, it’s Bell’s eager reporter that dons the more stereotypical 1980s fashions in the film.“It was really fun working with the costume designer to create all these amazing shoulder pads and all these cool pastels,” Bell explained. “And [my character's] hair obviously had to be big so we did hot rollers every day which was fun and then teased the crap out of it.”One awesome last accessory tied all Bell’s outfits together, though: press-ons.“I wore press-on nails,” she admitted, “because everybody had long, pink fingernails in the ’80s.”Big Miracle opens nation wide Feb. 3.–Patrick Gomez Kristen Bell,TV & Movies

Playing an ode to spring

BRISTOL — Like Punxsutawney Phil, who makes his annual appearance on Feb. 2, the Groundhog Day Concert Band will awaken from its musical slumber to hasten the arrival of spring at the First Congregational Church in Bristol this Sunday. For the past 20 years, a group of musicians, all with connections to the church, have come together under the direction of Bennett Burnham, to play a concert during the Sunday service nearest Groundhog Day. “My children played in the band and I could see all these kids in the day care who played instruments. I thought I’d get them together to play a couple of tunes,” he said. “Since nothing happens in January, I had no competition with Little League, football, the Fourth of July or other activities.” This past Sunday, with one week to go before the band’s anniversary concert, Mr. Burnham’s uncertainty and optimism for a good turnout was evident. In front of him, two plastic buckets holding over a dozen folded music stands still contained most of the stands. For the next hour, the four trumpet players, Mr. Burnham, Karen Griffith-Dieterich and father-daughter duo Andrew and Hope MacKeith; clarinet player, Candy Alessandro; and flutists, Ruth Fisher and Jacob Johnson ran through the 10 songs in their repertoire. For some, the annual event is an opportunity to test their chops. “This is the only time I play my trumpet. Every year after the Groundhog concert I think, ‘Maybe I’ll practice more.’ But it’s not until Bennett goads me into playing that I take it out again,” Ms. Griffith-Dieterich said. Past versions of the band have included percussion, woodwinds, brass, violins, cellos and guitars, Mr. Burnham said. With the extent of their performance lasting only 15 minutes before the start of the 10 a.m. service through the recessional, the band also decided to take its act on the road to get in more playing time. After Sunday’s service, they head over to the Rhode Island Veterans’ Home for a special concert for the veterans. “I never know who I’ll have until that morning,” he said, adding he’s always looking to recruit new talent. “Every note that you give us is one more note that we wouldn’t have if you didn’t come.”